Virtual Assistant Services for Small Advertising Agencies

October 5, 2007

If you are an owner of a small ad agency, you should consider establishing a business relationship with a Virtual Assistant (VA), especially if you have a small budget. Owners of advertising agencies and owners of virtual assistant businesses are similar; therefore, a Virtual Assistant understands and can anticipate your business needs. We both submit bids. An agency and a VA both respond to RFPs from potential clients. An agency’s and a Virtual Assistant’s services are billed hourly and generally are temporary. When a projected is completed, the job is over. We both work ourselves right out of a job. Ad agencies and VA businesses generally are small. According to U. S. Department of Labor, 68% of advertising agencies and public relations firms employ 1-4 employees. Majority of Virtual Assistant businesses are sole proprietorship.

We understand how time-consuming the daily mundane tasks can be. Generally these tasks are administrative in nature and can be delegated or outsourced to a Virtual Assistant. Examples of these tasks include bookkeeping, updating your website, setting appointments, placing phone calls, following up on e-mails, typing business documents, correspondences, etc. The time you save can be used to gain new clients and/or retain your current clients. A relationship between an agency and a Virtual Assistant has several advantages. When working with a Virtual Assistant, you only pay for the actual time used. Why pay someone for down time. There would be no need to pay a full-time salary or benefits. If the agency is limited on space, there would be no need to expand to accommodate an administrative assistant. A Virtual Assistant works from his or her office.

Being that advertising and Virtual Assistant industries are similar in many ways, we could establish a viable business relationship.

Rita J. Cartwright, Owner
RJ’s Word Processing Services
Your Business Success Is Our Success
http://www.rjswordprocessing.com
866-651-3073

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Today’s Typical Small Business Owner

July 25, 2007

According to a study done by Experian, small businesses make up 99.7% of all U.S. businesses. Small business is described as employing fewer than 500. Who are these small business owners? Today’s small business owner is between 48-51 years old and is likely to have a college degree. They also tend to participate in physical activities, as well as being active travelers. Women start 1,600 businesses a day, according to Intuit Future of Small Business Report.

Intuit’s report states one of the main reasons that women become small business owners is to get around the “glass ceiling.” Mothers with small children find it more feasible to work from home; therefore, becoming mompreneurs. The percentage of women business owners is growing almost twice the rate of all businesses.

I find these statistics to be quite interesting because they reflect me. I am a 53 year old, educated, woman who exercises on a regular basis. When I received my marketing degree, my plan was to work in the marketing department of a corporation. It never occurred to me to become an entrepreneur. Needless to say, my plans to work for a corporation didn’t quite pan out. Graduating from college at 44 years old presented obstacles. After numerous applications and several disappointing interviews, I decided that if they won’t hire me, I will hire myself. So, I combined my experience and education; therefore, coming up with the concept of providing virtual assistant services. And the rest is history.

Based on the aforementioned information and statistics, I guess I am what is known as “today’s typical small business owner.”

Rita J. Cartwright, Owner
RJ’ Word Processing Services
http://www.rjswordprocessing.com


The New Face of Airlines

July 19, 2007

My husband and I recently traveled to Nashville for his family reunion, and we noticed that there is a new face in airlines. We flew on two different airlines, and one of them in particular employs mature flight attendants. Obviously, when flight attendants were known as stewards and stewardesses, they were not quite as mature. As someone who just had a 53rd birthday, I appreciated seeing the new face of today’s airlines.

When I received my bachelor’s degree, I was 44 years old. Needless to say, changing careers at that age had its difficulties. One of the reasons I started my own virtual assistant business was due to the type of positions I was offered.

There are stereotypes surrounding older workers; for example, they won’t last long or they have health issues, which leads to absenteeism. In fact, employees who are 50+ are more reliable, have stability, knowledge, and experience. The workforce can’t survive without this group of people who are also known as baby boomers. According to an article by Marian Stoltz-Loike, PhD and David Madison, PhD entitled “Making Full Use Of The Maturing Workforce,” there were 76 million baby boomers born between the years 1946 – 1964. Due to the erosion of retirement savings or lack of retirement plans, baby boomers can’t afford to retire.

The workforce is comprised mostly of baby boomers and, if they all retire taking their knowledge with them, it will be up to the younger generation to carry on. No matter how educated younger employees are they lack the necessary knowledge that is required to run the business. It would be in the best interest of employers or hiring managers, who are generally younger, to realize this important fact. Apparently, American Airlines is aware of this vital detail. The flight attendants look just like me.

Rita J. Cartwright, Owner
RJ’s Word Processing Services
http://www.rjswordprocessing.com


Virtual Assistants Do More Than Just Type

July 3, 2007

Virtual Assistants (VAs) who are business owners do more than just type. We are also entrepreneurs, in addition to being small business owners. Virtual Assistant Networking Association (VANA) defines VAs as “A Virtual Assistant (substitute VA or Virtual Associate) works independently at an arm’s length, via the Internet, utilizing the latest technologies, to provide immediate professional support, services and skills to busy entrepreneurs and business managers.” International Virtual Assistant Association (IVAA) definition is “A Virtual Assistant (VA) is an independent entrepreneur providing administrative, creative and/or technical services. Utilizing advanced technological modes of communication and data delivery, a professional VA assists clients in his/her area of expertise from his/her own office on a contractual basis.”

As small business owners, we face the same issues and concerns as our clients. VAs are dedicated to helping their clients grow their businesses, while at the same time expanding his/her own company. It is a win-win situation. In addition to providing services, we are faced with the daily operations of a small business. These operations include everything from bookkeeping to marketing. In fact, VAs are hiring their own virtual assistants to help with the administrative tasks. We understand our clients’ business needs, because we are them. We do more than just type.

Rita J. Cartwright, Owner
RJ’s Word Processing Services
http://www.rjswordprocessing.com


Another Way To Grow Your Virtual Assistant Business

June 30, 2007

We, as virtual assistants (VAs), generally attempt to grow our businesses by obtaining more clients. Now the new strategy is to grow our businesses by organizing a team of VAs to subcontract or outsource projects to. These VAs provide services, which will complement your services rather than compete with them.

In an attempt to grow my virtual assistant business and deepen my service list, I’m applying the same strategy. I recently organized a team of three VAs. My core service is word processing, and my team services include bookkeeping, real estate virtual assistant services (REVA), transcription, and website design. Their services complement my services rather than compete with them. Now I can offer these services in addition to my current offerings.

If you are Virtual Assistant wanting to grow your business, consider organizing a team of virtual assistants.

Rita J. Cartwright, Owner
RJ’s Word Processing Services
http://www.rjswordprocessing.com


A Day In The Life Of A Virtual Assistant

June 25, 2007

My day started with a phone call from a potential team member. After our discussion, we decided she will become a member of RJ’s Word Processing Services team. Then I received a RFP, which I will subcontract to one of my current team members if I get the project. We communicated via several e-mails regarding the RFP. We also use IM for communicating, but not today. Next, I received another phone call from another potential team member. Then I had to type up a contract for the new team member. Next, I began putting together the proposal for the RFP. My day ended with a phone call from a potential client on the east coast. I’m on the west coast. Because of technology and the Internet, this is a typical day in the life a Virtual Assistant; at least, for this Virtual Assistant.

Rita J. Cartwright, Owner
RJ’s Word Processing Services
http://www.rjswordprocessing.com


Do You Know Who Your Target Audience Is?

June 24, 2007

When creating an advertising message, it is important that you know who you are talking to. Do you know who your target audience is? If you don’t know, you are not maximizing your advertising and/or marketing efforts.

A member of the target audience influences the purchasing decision and/or the person who makes the purchase. The person who makes the purchase is also a member of the target market. For example, when McDonald’s creates an advertising message, it is directed at their target audience, as well as their target market. Children are the target audience and their parents are the target market. Therefore, McDonald’s strategy is to target both groups.

Do you know who you are talking to?

Rita J. Cartwright, Owner
RJ’s Word Processing Services
Your Business Success Is Our Success
http://www.rjswordprocessing.com
866-651-3073